The Reason I Write The Heroic Yes! Blog

I write this blog because I have listened intently to countless teachers and learned from them.  I so appreciate what they have given me.

Could I’ve found my path of healing and transformation without my many teachers?  Hardly!

Saying that, did I always apply what I learned?  Of course not!  Some of what I learned didn’t resonate with my desires at the time.  Some seemed over my head.   Some seemed overwhelming.   Some seemed like just plain too much work.

But I applied enough of what I learned from my teachers to design my own unique way to heal and transform my life. 

I’m able to write what you are reading now because so many teachers took the time to share their wisdom with me.

The intention I hold as I pen these blogs is that they will provide you with ideas to apply to your life, ideas that will fuel your success, add to your joy and inspire you to go for your dreams.

It’s of course up to you to decide which of these ideas to apply and which to let go of, for within you, you hold the priceless knowledge of how best to create your life.

Inspiration for writing these blogs comes to me because I know that it’s possible to learn from each other.  I’ve learned from so many, and now I’m honored to pass this collection of wisdom, combined with my personal life experience on to you.

Writing is also part of my profession.  As such, I envision that these blogs will open up opportunities for me that are financially rewarding.  My intention is to be the best teacher I can be.  And just like a professor who loves to teach also earns money for his work, I need to be responsible for letting my writing become a way to draw financial abundance into my life.

Finally, I write these blogs because I love to write and I love to teach.  I love how interesting life is.  I love how many opportunities we have to learn and grow. I love how free we are to develop the skills to create our dreams.

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com. 

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Tune Into the Language of Your Growth

As small kids, we naturally discovered that being incapable of an activity was often a temporary state.  We were incapable of talking until we learned to talk.  Just because at one point we weren’t talking, didn’t mean we would always be unable to talk.  As toddlers, I don’t think we even considered not learning to talk.  We just did it.  Our growth was very natural.  We didn’t question it.

To learn to talk, we discovered that we had to listen closely to what people older than us were saying and repeat it.  So we did! (Can you imagine how hard it would be to learn to talk if we had refused to listen?)

And not only did we listen to the older kids and adults around us speak, we PRACTICED speaking again and again until eventually we learned to communicate with language easily and naturally.

I started reflecting upon the determination with which small children learn because in a Bikram Yoga class a few months ago, I became so dizzy that I chose to sit out many of the poses.  But I remember that I kept listening to the cues the teacher was giving and thinking about the poses as the other students did them.

The Bikram experience got me thinking about how often in life I have not been determined to learn.  On many occasions, I have chosen to sit out activities because I felt incapable of them.  Not only did I sit the activities out, but I also tuned the teachers of those activities out and started daydreaming, instead of listening to their wisdom and instructions.  It was like since I didn’t feel capable of performing these activities, I put a blindfold on and covered my ears to see if that would help me learn.  It didn’t.  And further, I wasn’t benefiting from the teacher’s enthusiasm for the activity. I was rather saying, “I CAN’T” and then through my lack of attention moving myself farther away from “I CAN.”

After years of stubbornness and frustration, I’m discovering that learning a challenging activity begins with listening and watching and continues with trying.  Trying can be very humbling.  In yoga class, I’ve tried Crane pose for years and haven’t YET been able to hold the pose for a length of time.  But now I always listen as the teacher explains the set-up.  Then I make an attempt.   And someday I’m confident that I will be able to hold crane.

I’ve discovered that close listening to our teachers is not only a sign of respect for our teachers, but a sign of respect for ourselves and our growth.

Let’s listen to all the people who take the time to teacher us challenging activities as we listened closely to every word when we were little kids learning to talk.  Back then every word brought with it the opportunity for us to GROW.  And we LOVED IT.  May listening closely to all who have things to teach us bring us GREAT JOY again.

Game of the Day

What do you LOVE about learning how to do a challenging activity?

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com. 

What To Do About The Things You Don’t Want To Do?

In high school, I had a chemistry teacher named Sister Silvis.  She was hard.   She was tough.  At times, I even felt that she was MEAN.  Chemistry was difficult and distressing.  I DIDN’T GET IT.  The homework took hours, excruciating hours of studying for tests, completing assignments and muddling through lab reports.  Yuck!!!

Did you ever have a teacher or a class, which you initially felt this way about?

As long as I felt incapable and powerless as I sat in Sister Silvis’s class, I despised chemistry.  As long as I felt angry about the injustice of having to take such a class, I was miserable. As long as I lived in fear of what chemistry grade would show up on my report card, I was scared of Sister Silvis.

I’ve found that every circumstance can be a teacher.  Sometimes when we are dealing with a really challenging circumstance, it feels like we definitely didn’t sign-up for this circumstance’s class.  Sometimes we definitely feel we don’t have any interest in learning what our challenging circumstance has to teach us.  In the middle of this process of struggling with our circumstance, there is often a learning curve, which may involve us being angry, frustrated, depressed, thinking “Why me?”, and feeling generally miserable.

Sometimes the best thing we learn from a challenging circumstance is to take steps that shorten the duration of the circumstance and to focus on choosing different circumstances in the future.

If I hadn’t had concern about what my parents and my classmates would say, I probably would have dropped Sister Silvis’s class in the first week.

On the other hand, sometimes we learn not to judge the worth of a situation by how we initially feel about it.

If I had dropped Sister Silvis’s class, I would have missed out on exploring chemistry, which to my great surprise, I eventually found to be  a fascinating subject.  And I would have missed out on learning from a very wise woman who I discovered to be an outstanding teacher.

Once I started understanding chemistry and being in awe that I could understand chemistry, I began to feel appreciation for this class.  On some days I almost even liked chemistry.  Through this learning process, I came to deeply respect and love Sister Silvis.

Bless the Memory of Sister Silvis

Game of the Day

Have you ever felt angry and depressed as you dealt with a challenging circumstance, and decided to take steps to shorten the duration of this circumstance?

Have you ever at first felt angry and depressed as you dealt with a challenging circumstance, only to later learn to deal with this circumstance in a way that gave you a sense of confidence and even joy?

How do you decide when to take steps to shorten the duration of a challenging circumstance?

How do you decide when to stick a tough circumstance out with the intention of learning what it has to teach and maybe even learning to find joy within it?

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com. 

Teaching and Giving Freedom

Some of our most rewarding moments can be teaching another person a skill so that they feel more able to create their own life and be free.  Here’s a poem on this subject:

GEOMETRY AND YOUR BIRTHDAY

In the season

Of your fifteenth year

We often start out

Moving in different directions

Along tangents off the circle

Of our commitments

Only to return

By radial routes

To the center

And one accord.

 

Dr. Jerome Freeman, who is my father, and whose birthday coincidently happens to be today, wrote this poem when both he and I were some years younger.

Think of the teachers you most appreciated.  At the time, they may have taught you very challenging material.  And if you are anything like me, you may have gotten frustrated because the material was so difficult. But once you learned these skills, you enjoyed a new sense of accomplishment and a new sense of freedom.  You enjoyed more freedom to “mov[e] in different directions” because of what you had learned.

Around the time of my fifteenth year, my father was teaching me how to drive.  This wasn’t an easy task because while I very much wanted the freedom of knowing how to drive, part of me was convinced that I would never be a good driver.  So that part of me that lacked confidence drove my dad and myself on many a hair-raising adventure.  But my dad was a great teacher who had confidence that I could learn to drive safely.  When I grew frustrated and wanted to give up, my dad’s confidence helped me get back in the driver’s seat.  Eventually and without major mishap, I learned to drive.  Driving has been a crucial to my daily life ever since.

My dad taught me how to drive and then gave me the freedom to choose where I drove.  This is a true gift from a very gifted man.

I realize now that because of my father’s commitment and love in teaching me how to drive, I could actually, at this point in my life, teach a teenager how to drive and then give him or her the freedom to drive where they wanted.

Maybe this is what it is like to come totally into “one accord” with our teachers; to have learned well, savored our freedom and progressed to the point where we are capable of passing our learning and freedom on to others.

*Something At Last: Dakota Poetry and Sketches  Poems by Jerome Freeman, Sketches by Jean Bailey, Pine Hill Press,  1993

Game of the Day

  1. Who have been the great teachers in your life?  What did they teach you?  How did they give you freedom to go in your own direction with what you learned from them?
  2. Wouldn’t it be nice to let at least one of them know the impact they have had on your life?
  3. What do you most want to teach others that you have learned from your teachers?

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com.