Are You Ready To Take Action?

As a kid, I always thought, “Sure, I’m ready to take action.  I’m ready to do something fun!  I’m ready to have an adventure.”

But as an adult, I have come to realize that sometimes we desperately want specific things to occur in our lives, but we aren’t in a place YET where we’re ready to take the actions that would allow them a greater chance of occurring.

We can be like a basketball player who keeps asking the coach to put him in the game.  However, the coach keeps looking down at the player’s feet.  Then EVERY SINGLE TIME, the coach shakes his head no.  The player gets more and more frustrated as he watches the coach rotate every player in and out of the game, sometimes two or even three times, EVERY PLAYER EXCEPT HIM.

Can you imagine the poor player’s frustration?

He keeps saying, “Come on! Put me in the game coach!  I’m ready to score lots of points!  I’m ready to make you proud!”

The player’s face becomes more and more red.

FINALLY, the coach takes pity on the player.  The coach simply points down at the player’s feet and says, “I’ll gladly put you in the game, if you put on your shoes.”

Sometimes if we look honestly at what we are presently doing in regards to preparing for our “basketball game,” we will find that we’re happy with little or no action, that at the moment taking action would bring us less joy than taking no action.

And this is OK.

When we take our actions from a place of being ready, we are more likely to enjoy them and be successful.

Of course, there’s a balance.  If we want to be in our “basketball game,” we do eventually have to put our shoes on. 

But knowing that it can be OK to wait to take action can give us more freedom to decide when to make our entrance onto the court.

Game of the Day

How do you decide when you are happy with little or no action in regards to a particular situation?

How do you decide when you are ready to take action?

How do you find comfort and joy with whatever decision you happen at this moment to make?

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com. 

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Celebrate Your Dream By Making A Video For YouTube

There’s great power in giving public voice to a dream you have by making a YouTube video.  Ina Lukas, the Creative Director at Heroic! Yes Productions, taught me this a few years ago.

When you get your dream on video, you declare, “THIS IS MY DREAM.  I’M CREATING IT.  AND I’M PROUD OF IT.  You make the leap to the other side of the screen.

What’s your dream?  What do you absolutely love about your dream?  What deeply inspires you about your dream?  How do you keep yourself happy with your dream on a daily basis?  What challenges have you had to dance with as you move towards achieving your dream?

Your dream can be a dream in process.  You don’t have to have realized the pinnacle of your dream to inspire others.  Just acknowledging that you have the dream and that you are taking steps towards it IS INSPIRING.

Think about it.  Who are you more interested in talking to at a party, the person who says nothing’s new or the person who’s excited to talk about her dreams?  When you hear her talking about her dreams, aren’t you more likely to want to talk about your dreams?

You can offer this same kind of inspiration to the world by speaking enthusiastically about a dream you have on YouTube. 

(You might say, “Now Jason, everyone in the world is not going to watch my YouTube video.  In fact, very few people may watch it.”)

Good point, this may be the case, but YouTube is viewed around the world thanks to the Internet.  When you post the YouTube video of your dream, you simply have no idea who will end up clicking on your video and being inspired to pursue their dreams.

One of the first videos I posted on YouTube was called “Follow Your Own Lead” and it was about my dream of coaching clients while we walked together.  Right after the video was posted, I remember that I would check the number of views on the video many times a day in hopes that it had suddenly gone viral.  In retrospect, I think I was so fixated on checking my YouTube views because I was searching for confirmation that I was up to something good.

I found it very tempting to believe that the more YouTube hits my video received, the more powerful and worthy my dream was.

Posting videos on YouTube helped me learn this valuable lesson about dreams-

The person your dream has to be most popular with is you.  The person who has to find the most joy in your dream is you.  Your dream is worthy and priceless because it’s your dream and you want to create it.  This is true whether ten people click on your video, or ten million.

How do you change the world?  It’s as simple as inspiring yourself, then one person and the next and the next.

Game of the Day

Film a 2 – 4 minute YouTube video of you talking about one dream you have.  (I recommend that you focus on one dream per video.  If you find this process fun and have more dreams that you want to share on YouTube, create more videos).

Post your video on YouTube.

Be happy and applaud yourself for proclaiming your dream to the world.

See what kind of response you get and at the same time always remember that the person your dream has to be most popular with is you.

So watch your own video and delight in how good it is.

And have confidence that you will naturally inspire others.

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com. 

From “As Seen on TV” to “As Seen in YOUR LIFE”

Who, like me, has ever watched a person do something amazing on TV and thought, “I would love to be able to do that, to live THEIR life, BUT that success is for actors, singers and professional athletes, not for me?”

Think about the scenes from TV that inspire you, the scenes that make you go, “Yes!  I would love to do what there’re doing!”

We can gaze longingly at dreamy images on TV and view these images as from another world, a world we’ll never set foot into.

Or you can look at your TV screen as an open door inviting you to stride confidently towards your dreams.

I bet many actors, singers and professional athletes were at one time themselves watching stars on TV and thinking, “Will I ever be able to do that?”

Then they figured out a way to answer that question with a “YES!

Game of the Day

What do you see people doing on TV that you would absolutely love to do?

How can you make the transition from seeing these people as superstars doing things that you will never be able to do, to looking at them as role models inspiring you to achieve your dreams?

What is your next step?

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com. 

Inspiring Others To Be Inspired By Themselves

We can inspire others simply by listening to them, offering them an inspiring perspective on their own life and asking them inspiring questions.

For example, if Matt asked Karen what she did, and she said, “Oh Matt, I don’t do much.  I’m just a dental hygienist during the day and take care of my kids and spend time with my husband at night.”

Matt would have the perfect opportunity to give Karen the chance to be inspired by herself.  Matt could talk about the big difference dental hygienists make.  He could say, “Karen, you give a great gift to your patients. Clean teeth are one of the building blocks to good oral health, not to mention good overall health.  Also, clean teeth help a person to be more confident.  And when people are more confident they are more likely to positively affect the world around them.”  (Matt is sounding a bit like a Wikipedia entry in this blog post.  But you get the idea.)

Matt could then talk about the importance of motherhood and also the importance of being a spouse.   In making these comments, Matt expresses appreciation for all Karen does for the world and gives her a chance to be inspired by who she is.

It is important that Matt says things he really means and doesn’t just make grandiose statements like, “I believe a dental hygienist is more important than all the kings, queens and presidents in the world put together.”  Unless Matt really means this, it would just sound like fluff and hot air and probably fail to inspire Karen in herself.  (If Matt really means this he has a deeply unique worldview.)

Matt could also ask Karen questions with the intention that as Karen answered she would be inspired by herself.  Questions like, “What do you love about being a dental hygienist?” and  “What types of patients do you love to see?”  (Negative questions like, “What parts of your job do you dislike,” probably won’t help Karen inspire herself.)

Depending on Karen’s job satisfaction, her answers to these questions might inspire her and they might not.  If her answers don’t inspire her, Matt could go back to talking about what impact dental hygienists, mothers and spouses have on the world. (And he could try sounding more natural and conversational and less like an encyclopedia.)

In my experience, a conversation where you can inspire someone about himself or herself is a really fun conversation to have because you feel good and they feel good.

Game of the Day

Who can you inspire to be inspired by him or herself today?

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com. 

Friday One Minute of Excitement

Claim the Miracle of Your Life!

Click on the link to watch the video for a one-minute inspirational blast!

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com. 

What To Do About The Things You Don’t Want To Do?

In high school, I had a chemistry teacher named Sister Silvis.  She was hard.   She was tough.  At times, I even felt that she was MEAN.  Chemistry was difficult and distressing.  I DIDN’T GET IT.  The homework took hours, excruciating hours of studying for tests, completing assignments and muddling through lab reports.  Yuck!!!

Did you ever have a teacher or a class, which you initially felt this way about?

As long as I felt incapable and powerless as I sat in Sister Silvis’s class, I despised chemistry.  As long as I felt angry about the injustice of having to take such a class, I was miserable. As long as I lived in fear of what chemistry grade would show up on my report card, I was scared of Sister Silvis.

I’ve found that every circumstance can be a teacher.  Sometimes when we are dealing with a really challenging circumstance, it feels like we definitely didn’t sign-up for this circumstance’s class.  Sometimes we definitely feel we don’t have any interest in learning what our challenging circumstance has to teach us.  In the middle of this process of struggling with our circumstance, there is often a learning curve, which may involve us being angry, frustrated, depressed, thinking “Why me?”, and feeling generally miserable.

Sometimes the best thing we learn from a challenging circumstance is to take steps that shorten the duration of the circumstance and to focus on choosing different circumstances in the future.

If I hadn’t had concern about what my parents and my classmates would say, I probably would have dropped Sister Silvis’s class in the first week.

On the other hand, sometimes we learn not to judge the worth of a situation by how we initially feel about it.

If I had dropped Sister Silvis’s class, I would have missed out on exploring chemistry, which to my great surprise, I eventually found to be  a fascinating subject.  And I would have missed out on learning from a very wise woman who I discovered to be an outstanding teacher.

Once I started understanding chemistry and being in awe that I could understand chemistry, I began to feel appreciation for this class.  On some days I almost even liked chemistry.  Through this learning process, I came to deeply respect and love Sister Silvis.

Bless the Memory of Sister Silvis

Game of the Day

Have you ever felt angry and depressed as you dealt with a challenging circumstance, and decided to take steps to shorten the duration of this circumstance?

Have you ever at first felt angry and depressed as you dealt with a challenging circumstance, only to later learn to deal with this circumstance in a way that gave you a sense of confidence and even joy?

How do you decide when to take steps to shorten the duration of a challenging circumstance?

How do you decide when to stick a tough circumstance out with the intention of learning what it has to teach and maybe even learning to find joy within it?

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com. 

Keeping It Short AND Sweet: In Praise of the Concise Conversation

I love great conversations with friends and family that last for hours, but in our daily lives there isn’t always time for such lengthy interactions.

So here comes the Short AND Sweet Conversation to save the day!  The Short AND Sweet conversation can be a wonderful way of communicating to people that you value them, while at the same time, taking care of any practical matters that may need to be addressed in the conversation.  In addition, the Short AND Sweet conversation respects the reality that you and the person you are conversing with may both be in the middle of very busy days.

Here are six Short AND Sweet Tips for creating a winning Short AND Sweet Conversation:

Concentrate – Focus on what the person is saying so that they feel heard and don’t have to repeat themselves.  Focus on what you are saying so that you stay attuned to the subject of the conversation and don’t stray off into digressions or side stories.

Keep It Polite – An easy way to get involved in a Lengthy AND Unfruitful conversation is by not being polite.  If you are not polite, your Short AND Sweet conversation is definitely no longer sweet and also very likely no longer short.  The person you’re talking with is offended.   You feel bad.  You apologize. The person you’re talking to accepts your apology (or doesn’t).  All of this foolishness takes time and creates drama.  Yuck!

Make Straightforward Requests – Respect the time of the person you’re talking with, as well as your own, by making requests in a clear, concise, and, of course, polite way.

Offer an HONEST Compliment – Go ahead, brighten the day of the person you’re talking to.  You make them feel good and strong, which adds joy to their day and strengthens your relationship to them.

Make Plans for a Future Conversation If Need Be – If it becomes clear that your Short AND Sweet conversation is turning into a Lengthy AND Detailed one, make plans with the person you are talking with to continue the conversation on an occasion when you both have plenty of time.

End On a High Note – Depending on the circumstances, this high note could be a high-five, a hug, well wishes for the rest of the day.  Or use your sense of the conversation to be creative and offer a final gorgeous high note to the conversation that leaves both of you happy as you part ways.

Game of the Day

Notice the Short AND Sweet conversations that you have today.