Friday One Minute of Excitement

What’s Behind That Door That You’re Opening?

Click on the link to watch the video for a one-minute inspirational blast!

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com

Friday One Minute of Excitement

Be the Smile You Want to See In the World

Click on the link to watch the video for a one-minute inspirational blast!

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com

Choosing the Pain of Growth


Say you strike up a conversation with someone you have never met before at a coffee shop.  You ask, “What’s a typical day like for you?”

They respond by saying, “I go to work.  I go to the gym.  I spend time with my family.  And I also make it a point to spend an hour a day doing something I really don’t want to do.”

This strikes you as slightly odd, so you inquire as to why and they say, “Haven’t you heard, ‘no pain, no gain’?  Haven’t you heard that discomfort is the only way to get beyond your comfort zone?  Haven’t you heard that all people who succeed constantly struggle to do it?”

How would this explanation seem to you?

The guy in the above example is coming from the idea that discomfort and pain leads to growth.

And it can.  Just think of the personal growth of a runner finishing her first marathon, a runner who two years ago doubted that she could even run two miles.

However, discomfort and pain can also lead to personal contraction.

For example, if I told myself, “Now, Jason, you have to write out each of your blogs longhand.  In addition, every time you see a new correction you want to make, you have to write the whole thing out again.  What you need to do, Jason, is write your blogs out longhand again and again until they are perfect.  Only then can you type them up.  This way you will learn to be perfect, Jason.”  (I’m finding it somewhat odd that I’m choosing at this point to talk about myself in third person.)

Now I’m much faster at typing than I am at writing longhand.  Writing blogs again and again longhand until they were perfect would probably take me sixteen hours a day and be very uncomfortable and even painful.

Would I experience personal growth of some sort?   There’s a chance.  But far more likely, I would experience personal contraction as I gave up yoga, social contact, cleaning my apartment, and basically the rest of my life in order to write-out blogs longhand.  Ridiculous, right?

To grow we need to become skilled at choosing discomfort and occasional pain that promotes our personal growth rather than discomfort and pain that promotes our personal contraction. 

When we were kids it was easy to tell if we were growing.  We grew taller.  This could be quickly measured with a yardstick.

For adults, personal growth is often harder to measure.  As we saw in the above examples, discomfort and pain can be associated with either personal growth OR personal contraction.

Maybe, the feelings surrounding the discomfort and pain could be an important indicator of whether or not we are in fact experiencing personal growth.

Although the marathon runner feels discomfort and pain during the marathon, she also feels the joy and wonder of accomplishing something she has never done before and then experiences the utter thrill of finishing.

Whereas, the feelings surrounding the discomfort and pain of writing my blogs out again and again until they were perfect would lead me to experience frustration that the process was taking all my time, loneliness from missing social interactions, and more frustration that my home was so dirty because I was devoting all my time to writing blogs out longhand.

Basically the pain and discomfort that the marathon runner experienced would help her to feel powerful and good about herself, whereas my hypothetical-harebrained-writing-blogs-out-longhand idea would lead me to feel powerless and miserable about myself.

As I write this, I’m becoming more and more amazed at how vast the difference between pains of personal growth and the pains of personal contraction can be.

So when you choose to experience pain and discomfort be sure that it’s actually taking you in the direction of your growth.

Game of the Day

How will you determine when you are experiencing pains of personal growth versus pains of personal contraction?

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com

Friday One Minute of Excitement

Are you ready to take the first step?

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com

Are You Ready To Take Action?

As a kid, I always thought, “Sure, I’m ready to take action.  I’m ready to do something fun!  I’m ready to have an adventure.”

But as an adult, I have come to realize that sometimes we desperately want specific things to occur in our lives, but we aren’t in a place YET where we’re ready to take the actions that would allow them a greater chance of occurring.

We can be like a basketball player who keeps asking the coach to put him in the game.  However, the coach keeps looking down at the player’s feet.  Then EVERY SINGLE TIME, the coach shakes his head no.  The player gets more and more frustrated as he watches the coach rotate every player in and out of the game, sometimes two or even three times, EVERY PLAYER EXCEPT HIM.

Can you imagine the poor player’s frustration?

He keeps saying, “Come on! Put me in the game coach!  I’m ready to score lots of points!  I’m ready to make you proud!”

The player’s face becomes more and more red.

FINALLY, the coach takes pity on the player.  The coach simply points down at the player’s feet and says, “I’ll gladly put you in the game, if you put on your shoes.”

Sometimes if we look honestly at what we are presently doing in regards to preparing for our “basketball game,” we will find that we’re happy with little or no action, that at the moment taking action would bring us less joy than taking no action.

And this is OK.

When we take our actions from a place of being ready, we are more likely to enjoy them and be successful.

Of course, there’s a balance.  If we want to be in our “basketball game,” we do eventually have to put our shoes on. 

But knowing that it can be OK to wait to take action can give us more freedom to decide when to make our entrance onto the court.

Game of the Day

How do you decide when you are happy with little or no action in regards to a particular situation?

How do you decide when you are ready to take action?

How do you find comfort and joy with whatever decision you happen at this moment to make?

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com. 

From “As Seen on TV” to “As Seen in YOUR LIFE”

Who, like me, has ever watched a person do something amazing on TV and thought, “I would love to be able to do that, to live THEIR life, BUT that success is for actors, singers and professional athletes, not for me?”

Think about the scenes from TV that inspire you, the scenes that make you go, “Yes!  I would love to do what there’re doing!”

We can gaze longingly at dreamy images on TV and view these images as from another world, a world we’ll never set foot into.

Or you can look at your TV screen as an open door inviting you to stride confidently towards your dreams.

I bet many actors, singers and professional athletes were at one time themselves watching stars on TV and thinking, “Will I ever be able to do that?”

Then they figured out a way to answer that question with a “YES!

Game of the Day

What do you see people doing on TV that you would absolutely love to do?

How can you make the transition from seeing these people as superstars doing things that you will never be able to do, to looking at them as role models inspiring you to achieve your dreams?

What is your next step?

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com. 

Inspiring Others To Be Inspired By Themselves

We can inspire others simply by listening to them, offering them an inspiring perspective on their own life and asking them inspiring questions.

For example, if Matt asked Karen what she did, and she said, “Oh Matt, I don’t do much.  I’m just a dental hygienist during the day and take care of my kids and spend time with my husband at night.”

Matt would have the perfect opportunity to give Karen the chance to be inspired by herself.  Matt could talk about the big difference dental hygienists make.  He could say, “Karen, you give a great gift to your patients. Clean teeth are one of the building blocks to good oral health, not to mention good overall health.  Also, clean teeth help a person to be more confident.  And when people are more confident they are more likely to positively affect the world around them.”  (Matt is sounding a bit like a Wikipedia entry in this blog post.  But you get the idea.)

Matt could then talk about the importance of motherhood and also the importance of being a spouse.   In making these comments, Matt expresses appreciation for all Karen does for the world and gives her a chance to be inspired by who she is.

It is important that Matt says things he really means and doesn’t just make grandiose statements like, “I believe a dental hygienist is more important than all the kings, queens and presidents in the world put together.”  Unless Matt really means this, it would just sound like fluff and hot air and probably fail to inspire Karen in herself.  (If Matt really means this he has a deeply unique worldview.)

Matt could also ask Karen questions with the intention that as Karen answered she would be inspired by herself.  Questions like, “What do you love about being a dental hygienist?” and  “What types of patients do you love to see?”  (Negative questions like, “What parts of your job do you dislike,” probably won’t help Karen inspire herself.)

Depending on Karen’s job satisfaction, her answers to these questions might inspire her and they might not.  If her answers don’t inspire her, Matt could go back to talking about what impact dental hygienists, mothers and spouses have on the world. (And he could try sounding more natural and conversational and less like an encyclopedia.)

In my experience, a conversation where you can inspire someone about himself or herself is a really fun conversation to have because you feel good and they feel good.

Game of the Day

Who can you inspire to be inspired by him or herself today?

Jason Freeman is a professional writer, and a one-of-a-kind public speaker.  He is the founder and CEO of Heroic Yes! Productions. Jason has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Nebraska.  He knows the pain of perceiving one’s life through a lens of limitation and also the thrill of moving beyond that mindset.  For more information on Jason’s powerful message, or to book him to present to your organization, go to www.HeroicYesProductions.com.